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Thread: KELVIN..apakah ia..

  1. #1

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    KELVIN..apakah ia..

    salam semua,ni saya nk start sesi btukar ilmu mengenai KELVIN
    apakah ia,bgaimanakah nk setting kelvin trbaik mengikut environment masing serta pelbagai lagi tentang
    KELVIN yg boleh dibincangkan disini..
    ini adalah lanjutan dr soal jawab dlm thread 9 Feb | Jitra

  2. #2
    Kelvin ialah nama apek kedai beskal kat jalan belakang rumah saya. muahahaha

    serius.. Kelvin nih benda baru pada saya.. tapi berbanding dengan preset white balance yang lain, saya lebih suka adjust Kelvin sebab senang nak cari mood yang kita nak.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kavalera
    Kelvin ialah nama apek kedai beskal kat jalan belakang rumah saya. muahahaha

    serius.. Kelvin nih benda baru pada saya.. tapi berbanding dengan preset white balance yang lain, saya lebih suka adjust Kelvin sebab senang nak cari mood yang kita nak.

    setuju dgn penyataan kavalera nie..
    he he he.. :p

  4. #4

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    kalau dalam kamera saya (Olympus e-500) kelvin tuh CWK kat preset WB.

    saya cuma pernah adjust2, tapi tak familiar la..

    itu pun zul78 yang ajar...

    tapi ada ka note yang related dgn kelvin ni?

    kalau ada boleh baca...

    t.kasih.
    MyNameIsMuhammadAzmir a.k.a t-rex :)

  5. #5

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    salam semua,ni saya nk start sesi btukar ilmu mengenai KELVIN
    apakah ia,bgaimanakah nk setting kelvin trbaik mengikut environment masing serta pelbagai lagi tentang
    KELVIN yg boleh dibincangkan disini..
    ini adalah lanjutan dr soal jawab dlm thread 9 Feb | Jitra

    hahahahiii nae....

    KELVIN nie syok....

    Basicly ko cume kne igt nie je..

    Room tu too orange pkai KELVIN RENDAh like 3K kebawah..(try n eror)
    huhuh...nie lagi stim dr main Tungsten mode.. :lol:

    x pon ko layan link nie....lg stimm...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_temperature
    012.343.73.59 (Freelance Photographer)
    What u call the P I C T U R E ?
    M U S E
    inTORQXICated Shutterbugs , Malaysia

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by trexclanz
    kalau dalam kamera saya (Olympus e-500) kelvin tuh CWK kat preset WB.

    saya cuma pernah adjust2, tapi tak familiar la..

    itu pun zul78 yang ajar...

    tapi ada ka note yang related dgn kelvin ni?

    kalau ada boleh baca...

    t.kasih.
    trexclanz, ni ada note pasal kelvin..harap iany membantu..
    special thanx to HAIRUL for this notes..lots of THANX!

    Yang Perlu dikongsi
    White Balance: The Underused Control On A Digital Camera
    Jul 14 '06

    The Bottom Line White balance is critical to a digital camera, being the starting point for all the colours it will record.GET YOUR WHITE BALANCE RIGHT!

    The human eye has a remarkable ability to adjust to different light conditions. Not only do our eyes have built-in auto-focus system and auto-exposure capability, but we also have automatic colour balance built into our brains. A white object will appear white to us whether viewed in sunlight or under overcast skies, or indoors under incandescent or fluorescent lighting that is because the human brain has the capability to compensate for such changes in perceived colour. A very efficient system indeed!

    The digital camera’s image sensor has the daunting task of emulating the human brain and therefore has to adjust colour so that the white appears white in all kinds of lighting conditions, be it fluorescent or tungsten indoors, on a cloudy day or in bright sunshine. Therefore, ultimately it all boils down to “Colour Temperature” or what is generally known as “White Balance” in digital camera terminology.

    Precise colour capturing and reproduction begins with an optimal white balance. The perceived colour of white often changes based on ambient conditions – outdoor (sunlight which is bluish) is perceived to be cooler, indoor (tungsten which is reddish) is perceived to be warmer and under fluorescent light it is perceived to be greener. Colour Temperature in other words is the ratio of the amount of blue light to the amount of red light; however the green light is ignored. The unit for measuring this ratio is in degrees Kelvin (K).

    Before we try to go into the finer details of how to set correct white balance we need to know what colour temperature of different light sources really are.

    LIGHT SOURCES (COLOUR TEMPERATURE IN K)

    OUTDOORS

    Open shade in the mountains (20,000+)
    Sunless blue skies (10,000 to 18,000)
    Heavily overcast sky (9,000 to 10,000)
    Slightly overcast sky (7,000 to 9,000)
    Electronic Flash (5,400 to 6,000)
    Noon Sun and Clear Sky (date dependent) (4,900 to 5,800)
    Sunlight at 30 Degree altitude (4,500)
    Sunlight at 20 Degree altitude (4,000)
    Sunlight at 10 Degree altitude (3,500)
    Sunrise and Sunset (3,000)

    INDOORS

    Warm white fluorescent tubes (4,000)
    200-watt Bulb (2,940 to 2,980)
    100-watt Bulb (2,860 to 2,900)
    75-watt Bulb (2,790 to 2,820)
    60-watt Bulb (2,770 to 2,800)
    40-watt Bulb (2,630 to 2,650)
    Very early sunrise (2,000 to 2,500)
    Gaslight (2,000 to 2,200)
    Candle Light/Oil lamps (1,000 to 2,000)

    The colour temperature chart above gives approx range in degrees Kelvin for the bulbs, the reason is that the bulbs temperature varies based on brands as well as due to aging, a new bulb will have a higher temperature and an older one lower, hence, the variations. Similarly, the candle light temperature can vary due to size of the flame, which is also approx. It must be noted that the Electronic flash is more or less equal to the colour temperature of average sunlight. The chart above should not be taken as a substitute for a colour meter which professionals use to calculate exact colour temperature in a given situation.

    SETTING THE WHITE BALANCE:

    If you are familiar with the film cameras, they used “Daylight” balanced films and “Tungsten” balanced films to compensate for the difference in lighting conditions indoors and outdoors. Besides the type of film, there were filters for the same purpose also which photographers used to achieve the correct colour balance. However, in digital cameras there is no film and the setting for achieving the correct colours can be set using white balance control by the users themselves.

    AUTO AND PRESET WHITE BALANCE:

    On most digital cameras, the user will find the white balance setting defaults to “Auto” mode. This setting works in most situations but is not very accurate. To achieve greater accuracy one needs to go into the menu mode and set appropriate preset white balance setting which could be “sunny”, “cloudy”, “flash”, “incandescent”, “fluorescent” etc. Some cameras have even greater control in the sense that the provided presets can be greater in number and may cater to something like “beach”, “snow”, “night scene” etc etc. It is always a good idea to use the specific preset as these settings will achieve better colour accuracy than by just using “Auto”. In my opinion “Auto” really means “Average”, come to think of it, that is what it really is. Why settle for average, when your camera has the required controls, use it to your advantage!

    CUSTOM WHITE BALANCE:

    Setting the white balance incorrectly not only will make the white appear bluish or reddish (depending on the setting) but will make all the other colours in the image to be rendered incorrectly as well. For example, if you set the white balance to “sunny” and take the photo indoors in “incandescent” light the picture will have predominantly reddish cast overall, on the other hand if the white balance is set to “incandescent” and the picture is taken outdoors, it will have a predominantly bluish cast overall. These two settings are fairly common on most digital cameras and one can experiment with this for better understanding of how the system works.

    Automatic/preset modes work on a digital camera in most situations but there are times when the automatic mode becomes a liability, especially in tricky light situations. This is where the user input becomes a necessity and ‘White Balance’ is needed to be precisely set to achieve the desired, acceptable or correct results. Custom or user-defined white balance is extremely useful when lighting conditions are confusing and you need the most accurate colour. With custom white-balance control, you point the camera at something white and tell the camera to adjust itself accordingly, which will make the white a pure white, without colour cast. You can also use 18% grey card like in olden days when using film cameras. Even a white T-shirt your subject is wearing can be used to set the white balance.

    An interesting thing to note is that the Auto White Balance tends to work much better in natural light compared to artificial light indoors, the reason? Very simple, the colour temperature of daylight corresponds better with the colour temperature of the camera when in Auto mode, unlike artificial light where the

    colour temperature set within the camera for “Incandescent” is not same as the bulbs in the room. Therefore, the likelihood of getting correct colours indoors is much less since the colour temperature of indoor lights can vary quiet a bit and may not match with the colour temperature set in your camera for a given setting, eventually rendering incorrect final images. Therefore, the Custom White Balance can be effectively used both indoors and outdoors to achieve correct colour balance. GET YOUR WHITE BALANCE RIGHT!

    COMPUTER SYSTEM: AN EXTENSION OF THE DIGITAL CAMERA

    Anyone using the digital camera knows that photos can be altered or corrected on the computer using photo editing software, but, it is a painful process which is time consuming and at the end you are probably not even sure if it is close to what it is supposed to be.

    Your computer is an extension and integral part of your Digital Camera system. You do not only transfer and save the images on your computer but also view, alter and print them. The monitor you use also has the capability of being correctly set up for display of images. Let’s assume, you have taken pictures with correct white balance setting and are well exposed, but, is your monitor showing correct colours?

    You can set up your monitor based on the guidelines in the manual of the monitor for imaging purpose but allow me to give you an insight into what it is all about.

    Professional television picture monitors use a standardized set of phosphors and are adjusted for a colour temperature of 6,500 K. In the US the colour temperature of consumer television sets is set at 7,100 K, which would give a brighter image but also slightly bluish as well. In Japan, the television sets are more likely to be set at 9,000 to 9,300 K making them bluish. However, European television makers tend to keep their television sets close to 6,500 K.

    The history behind the colour temperature setting is that in olden days (black and white) the available phosphor, a yellow-blue combination had a colour temperature of 9,300 K.
    Black and white monitors used in television production today are set at 6,500 K since they are intermixed with colour monitors having colour temperature setting of 6,500 K.

    Computer monitors white balance or white point should be set to 6,500K if any photo editing is to be done at all, since the default setting of the monitors is usually 9,300 K.
    This way no matter where the picture is being displayed it will be correct. Take for instance a monitor which is set at 9,300 K and colours are adjusted on them, the result on a calibrated screen will be that of yellow/reddish cast. Similarly, it is also important that you set the colour depth to at least 24 bit or ideally 32 bit because at these settings you see true colours unlike 16 bit, which is for general purpose applications.

    The resolution of your screen is also important which you must set between 72 and 100 pixels per inch anything lower than 72 will result in less detail and anything over 100 you may be sending more information than your monitor or eyes can resolve. Here is a table which will give you an idea of the resolution based on the size of your monitor.

    First the Monitor Size (in inches),Recommended Resolution followed by Pixels Per Inch

    17 inches

    1024x768 81
    1152x864 91

    19 inches

    1024x768 72
    1152x864 81
    1280x960 90

    21 inches
    1280x960 81
    1600x1200 101

    The new breed of LCD monitors have the setting “sRGB” which is an ideal setting to use if you need to have your digital camera matched for correct colours, for CRT the setting to be used is 6,500 K which also actually corresponds to “sRGB”, meaning both are one and the same. The contrast should be set at highest if possible (without being harsh).

    The white balance setting of a camera deals with only the colours that are captured by the digital camera. White balance is critical to a digital camera, being the starting point for all the colours it will record. Whatever the source of light, if the white balance is set correctly, colours of a subject photographed under a particular lighting condition will be reproduced more faithfully. Use your camera correctly, get your colours right, after all you have paid for all those controls on your camera and it’s about time you used them to your own benefit.

    Thank you for dropping by and reading what I write.


    Happy shooting!

    All Text Copyright Quadophile 2006

    layari laman web http://www.astropix.com/HTML/I_ASTROP/CUSTOMWB.HTM

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.JayKill
    salam semua,ni saya nk start sesi btukar ilmu mengenai KELVIN
    apakah ia,bgaimanakah nk setting kelvin trbaik mengikut environment masing serta pelbagai lagi tentang
    KELVIN yg boleh dibincangkan disini..
    ini adalah lanjutan dr soal jawab dlm thread 9 Feb | Jitra

    hahahahiii nae....

    KELVIN nie syok....

    Basicly ko cume kne igt nie je..

    Room tu too orange pkai KELVIN RENDAh like 3K kebawah..(try n eror)
    huhuh...nie lagi stim dr main Tungsten mode.. :lol:

    x pon ko layan link nie....lg stimm...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_temperature
    aku igt sapa la td ni..stim sekejapan aku td menengokkan avatar kamu..aku igt td,liza dh..wawakaka
    tp guna kelvin mmg best wpun aku x reti sgt settingny..

  8. #8
    Color temperature describes the spectrum of light which is radiated from a "blackbody" with that surface temperature. A blackbody is an object which absorbs all incident light-- neither reflecting it nor allowing it to pass through. A rough analogue of blackbody radiation in our day to day experience might be in heating a metal or stone: these are said to become "red hot" when they attain one temperature, and then "white hot" for even higher temperatures. Similarly, blackbodies at different temperatures also have varying color temperatures of "white light." Despite its name, light which may appear white does not necessarily contain an even distribution of colors across the visible spectrum:







    Relative intensity has been normalized for each temperature (in Kelvins).
    Note how 5000 K produces roughly neutral light, whereas 3000 K and 9000 K produce light spectrums which shift to contain more orange and blue wavelengths, respectively. As the color temperature rises, the color distribution becomes cooler. This may not seem intuitive, but results from the fact that shorter wavelengths contain light of higher energy.

    Why is color temperature a useful description of light for photographers, if they never deal with true blackbodies? Fortunately, light sources such as daylight and tungsten bulbs closely mimic the distribution of light created by blackbodies, although others such as fluorescent and most commercial lighting depart from blackbodies significantly. Since photographers never use the term color temperature to refer to a true blackbody light source, the term is implied to be a "correlated color temperature" with a similarly colored blackbody. The following table is a rule-of-thumb guide to the correlated color temperature of some common light sources:

    Color Temperature Light Source
    1000-2000 K Candlelight
    2500-3500 K Tungsten Bulb (household variety)
    3000-4000 K Sunrise/Sunset (clear sky)
    4000-5000 K Fluorescent Lamps
    5000-5500 K Electronic Flash
    5000-6500 K Daylight with Clear Sky (sun overhead)
    6500-8000 K Moderately Overcast Sky
    9000-10000 K Shade or Heavily Overcast Sky

    nie saya amik dari http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutori ... .htm..more info bole tgk page tue

  9. #9

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    gud tip n info suhaimi....tq... :lol:
    012.343.73.59 (Freelance Photographer)
    What u call the P I C T U R E ?
    M U S E
    inTORQXICated Shutterbugs , Malaysia

  10. #10

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    aku igt sapa la td ni..stim sekejapan aku td menengokkan avatar kamu..aku igt td,liza dh..wawakaka
    tp guna kelvin mmg best wpun aku x reti sgt settingny..
    hahaah ala nae...liza pon stim ke???wakakka...bile hang nak mai shah alam nie...
    012.343.73.59 (Freelance Photographer)
    What u call the P I C T U R E ?
    M U S E
    inTORQXICated Shutterbugs , Malaysia

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.JayKill
    aku igt sapa la td ni..stim sekejapan aku td menengokkan avatar kamu..aku igt td,liza dh..wawakaka
    tp guna kelvin mmg best wpun aku x reti sgt settingny..
    hahaah ala nae...liza pon stim ke???wakakka...bile hang nak mai shah alam nie...
    liza---------kelvin
    dua2 aku suka! :twisted:
    sori ter OT plak dlm ruangan ilmiah ni

  12. #12

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    ok.. tq. good info...
    MyNameIsMuhammadAzmir a.k.a t-rex :)

  13. #13

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    penerangan dari ape yang aku paham bila aku baca artikel tadi :

    so secara kesimpulannya :

    1. kalau lagi rendah kelvin tuh, maknanya makin panas..

    2. kalau makin tinggi, makin sejuk...

    contoh :

    kalau kita shoot tghari (sunny) + pencahayaan tinggi , so kita kena set kelvin makin rendah ?

    kalau shoot kurang cahaya, kita kena set kelvin makin tinggi ?

    betul ker?
    MyNameIsMuhammadAzmir a.k.a t-rex :)

  14. #14

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    Kelvin...secara ringkas dari pemahaman aku sendiri...

    5000 ke atas > semakin kuning
    5000 ke bawah > semakin biru

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by shaifulrizal
    Kelvin...secara ringkas dari pemahaman aku sendiri...

    5000 ke atas > semakin kuning
    5000 ke bawah > semakin biru
    sepol, yang paling maksimun brapa?
    MyNameIsMuhammadAzmir a.k.a t-rex :)

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